COVID-19 Info Centre

Updated BC extended daily health check and action guide

January 24, 2022 – Following last week’s changes to the BC Centre for Disease Control’s recommendations around COVID-19, the provincial government created this document to help support families in navigating what to do – from reminders on symptoms to detailed instructions on self-isolation: Government of BC extended daily health check and symptom guide

To make it easier to read, we’ve stripped the content out of file and placed it directly below. To maintain the format of the chart created, we’ve included it as a picture, but links can be accessed to those relevant sections by opening the PDF above.

The below extracted content is also directly available from the Province of BC at this page: http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/bulletin/20220121/daily-health-check—jan-2022.pdf
As noted, this information and guidance is adapted from the BC Centre for Disease Control. For more information, visit http://www.bccdc.ca/health-info/diseases-conditions/covid-19


Daily Health Check and What to Do When Sick

Daily Health Check

Everyone going into to school must complete a daily health check, including staff, visitors, and students. A daily health check means checking yourself or your child for new symptoms of illness, including symptoms of COVID-19.
Symptoms of illness (including COVID-19) include things like:

  • Fever or chills
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Runny nose
  • Headache
  • Diarrhea
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Sneezing
  • Body aches
  • Loss of sense of smell or taste
  • Loss of appetite
  • Extreme fatigue or tiredness
  • Nausea or vomiting

If you are sick or feel unwell, stay at home. This is important to stop the spread of illness, including COVID-19, in schools.

You can attend school if:

  • Your symptoms are consistent with a previously diagnosed health condition (e.g., seasonal allergies), OR
  • You have existing symptoms that have improved to where you feel well enough to return to regular activities,

AND you are not required to self-isolate, or your self-isolation period is over (based on a positive COVID-19 test result, if taken).


What to Do When Sick

If you have mild symptoms of COVID-19, you usually don’t need a test. Mild symptoms are symptoms that can be managed at home. Most people don’t need testing for COVID-19.

Stay home and away from others (as much as possible) until you feel well enough to return to your regular activities and you no longer have a fever. You should also avoid non-essential visits to higher risk settings such as long term care facilities and gatherings, for another 5 days after ending isolation.

If you have a Rapid Antigen Test at home, use it when you have symptoms. How long you should stay home depends on your test result. Find out more about Rapid Antigen Test results.

If you do not have symptoms of COVID-19, you do not need a test.

If you are unsure about your symptoms, you can use the Self-Assessment Tool, contact your health care provider or call 8-1-1.

Testing may be recommended for some people who may be more likely to get severe disease. See BCCDC for information on who testing is recommended for.

What to Do if Someone in Your Household is Sick

You can continue to attend school if someone in your household is sick and/or self-isolating as long as you do not have any symptoms of illness and feel well. This includes if they have tested positive for COVID-19.

Try to stay apart from the person in your household who is sick as much as possible.

Ensure you closely monitor yourself (or your child) for symptoms of illness and stay home if you develop symptoms of illness or feel unwell.


If You Test Positive for COVID-19

Your age and vaccination status determine how long you should self-isolate for if you test positive for COVID-19.

Age Vaccination Status Guidance
Under 18 years of age Unvaccinated, partially vaccinated or fully vaccinated Self-isolate at home for 5 days AND until your symptoms improve and you no longer have a fever. Avoid non-essential visits to higher risk settings like long-term care facilities and gatherings for another 5 days after ending isolation.
18 years of age or older Fully Vaccinated
NOT fully vaccinated Self-isolate at home for 10 days AND until your symptoms improve and you no longer have a fever.

Close contacts, who are usually others in your household, do not need to self-isolate (regardless of vaccination status), but should closely self-monitor for symptoms. BCCDC has more information for close contacts.


If you find it hard to breathe, have chest pain, can’t drink anything, feel very sick, and/or feel confused, contact your health care provider right away or go to your local emergency department or call 9-1-1.


What to Do When Sick

*Again, to access links listed in this graphic, please open and use the PDF of this BC Government larger document instead. 

What to do if someone is sick in your household

You can continue to attend school if someone in your household is sick and/or self-isolating as long as you do not have any symptoms of illness and feel well. This includes if they have tested positive for COVID-19. Ensure you closely monitor yourself (or your child) for symptoms of illness and stay home if you feel unwell. The best way to protect yourself and your family from COVID-19 is to get vaccinated. Vaccines are available for anyone ages 5 and up. Register now at: Getvaccinated.gov.bc.ca

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